Advanced Steel Construction

Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 67-84 (2005)


STEEL FRAMED STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF BLAST AND FIRE - PART 1: STATE-OF-THE-ART REVIEW

 

H.X. Yu and J.Y. Richard Liew*

*Department of Civil Engineering, National University of Singapore,

BLK E1A, 1 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

DOI:10.18057/IJASC.2005.1.1.4

 

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ABSTRACT

Design of public infrastructure against terrorism has become a rising concern with the objective of reducing the level of damage to property and the loss of life. Some of the terrorism acts take the form of blastfollowed by fire causing catastrophic failure of the structure. This paper studies the response of steel framed structuressubjected to the combined effects of blast and fire. A state-of-the-art summary on issues related to separateassessment of blast and fire resistance of multistory building frames is provided. This is followed by a systematicinvestigation on the combined effects of blast and fire using a proposed two-step dynamic analysis procedure. In Part2 of a companion paper, a typical multi-storey building will be analyzed to study its behavior under a medium-scaleexplosion which triggers a post-blast fire in the affected compartment. This particular structure is found to bevulnerable as it possesses little fire resistance due to the high level of deformation caused by the blast load. The aimof this two-part paper is to advance the use of simulation tools for collapse analysis of three dimensional steelstructures subject to attack by fire and explosion so that the complex interaction effects of blast and fire can beunderstood and quantified.

 

KEYWORDS

blast, fire, Structural analysis, steel frame


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